News and Events

  • Xiaofeng Zhu, PhD, collaborates in identifying genetic variations associated with blood oxygen levels during sleep Find out more…

 

2019 Joint Biostatistics Symposium

Register here

Please let us know if you would like to present a poster.

The Annual Joint Biostatistics Symposium is an initiative of The Ohio State University, the Cleveland
Clinic, and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The symposium provides an opportunity
for faculty, students and professionals in data analysis to stay current on challenges and opportunities, and to foster
future collaborations.

Key note: Kathryn Roeder, PhD
Professor of Statistics and Computational Biology and Vice Provost for Faculty, Carnegie Mellon University

Additional speakers from OSU, CCF and CWRU On topics ranging from optimal trial designs to novel statistical approaches to analyzing complex data sets.

Additionally, there will be poster sessions throughout the day.

When: Friday, April 19, 2019 / 10:45 am to 3:30 pm

Where: The Wolstein Research Building
Case Western Reserve University
2103 Cornell Road, Cleveland
Main Lobby

Lunch: Box lunches and snacks will be provided

Parking: $5 – public parking / Uptown Triangle Garage 11501 Mayfield Road, Cleveland
Additional options here.

Contact: Ming Li, PhD, Associate Professor

Population & Quantitative Health Sciences
Email: MXL675@case.edu

 

 


Past Annoucements

Chun Li, PhD, collaborates with Vanderbilt colleagues on novel statistical methods

Cleveland, Ohio – A woman diagnosed with HIV works with her care team who consider many variables in tailoring a treatment plan that tracts if the therapeutics being used are keeping the virus in check. They may consider the estimated length of time from infection, her BMI (body mass index) which can fluctuate over time, […]

PQHS Educational Open House

Open House: Department of Population & Quantitative Health Sciences Learn more:  Graduate certificates, Master’s and PhD programs Biomedical and Health Informatics Public Health Epidemiology and Biostatistics Clinical Research Tuesday, February 19, 2019 / 3:30 – 6:30 pm Wolstein Research Building – 1223 Lounge Area Light refreshments served Find us:  pqhs.case.edu Email:  nlk@case.edu – Nickalaus Koziura […]

Jessica Cooke Bailey, PhD, MA, receives grant from BrightFocus Foundation

Jessica N. Cooke Bailey, PhD, MA, recently received a grant from the BrightFocus Foundation to continue her team’s work in glaucoma, with a focus on the Amish community of Holmes county in central Ohio. Glaucoma, like many complex conditions, has both genetic and environmental variables as contributing factors. Her work builds on long-term relationships with […]

Calendar

  • Grant Submissions Link

    November 18, 2019 @ 8:00 am - 8:30 am

    Attention faculty:

    If you have any new grant submissions coming up, please fill out the form here:

    https://goo.gl/forms/yBWBqEnBRMfCpjYo1

    See more details

  • PQHS 501 Seminar

    November 18, 2019 @ 8:45 am - 9:45 am
    Wolstein Research Bldg. 1217

    PQHS 501 Seminar

    The presenters will be Elina Misicka and Gwen Donley, MPH

    Elina Misicka will present:

    "Instrumental Variable Analysis: a framework to examine causality in observational data"

    Observational studies, while widely used in the field of epidemiology, are frequently subject to issues of confounding, measurement error, and reverse causality. In the event of unmeasured confounding, the use of instrumental variable (IV) analysis in such studies is becoming increasingly common. In IV analysis, an instrument is created from a variable closely related to an exposure of interest, and is used in place of a direct measurement of the exposure. Functioning under several assumptions – some empirically testable and some not – this instrument can prove to be a robust estimator of the exposure, and may be used to calculate the relationship between exposure and outcome independent of unmeasured confounding. IV analysis is currently experiencing popularity in the field of genetic epidemiology through the use of Mendelian randomization (MR), where the instrument in IV analysis consists of one or more fixed genetic variants associated with an exposure of interest. This technique has the potential to fill a defined niche in the etiology of disease; MR may be used to capture variation in an exposure due explicitly to genetic predisposition. However, the utilization of genetic data in such a manner requires additional assumptions that must be carefully managed and mitigated if MR is to prove a robust and reliable tool in the genetic epidemiologist’s toolset. Today’s talk concludes with a brief exploration of the use of MR in recent studies on the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), approximating the effects of obesity on various aspects of the MS phenotype.

    Gwendolyn Donley will present:

    "Re-Defining the Food Environment: the Misdiagnosis of Food Inaccessibility"

    Inequitable access to healthy foods is a national concern. Cleveland serves as a case study for nutrition inequity, with nearly 60% of the population living in areas that lack access to grocery stores and healthy food options. Objective measures of the food environment such as counts of the availability of healthy food stores and maps capturing the distance to healthy food retail are related to obesity, diabetes, and metabolic health. However, strategies to improve the food environment based on these objective measures have not had the desired long-term effects; while important, food availability is just one aspect of the food environment and neglects other, more subjective measures, including individual perceptions and beliefs. Perceptions of the food environment are associated with dietary choices and decision-making, which have implications for overall health, well-being, and disease risk. Current methodology, based on survey methods, does not allow for in-depth approaches to assess the complexity of such perceptions. Additionally, there is a dearth of understanding about how these perceptions are geographically dispersed and what other contextual factors contribute to the perceived food environment and consequent dietary behaviors. This necessitates an approach incorporating both objective and spatial measures of the food environment and subjective measures of perceptions. Together, these measures can enhance our understanding of mechanisms through which food environments facilitate or constrain dietary behaviors. SVGs (spatial video geonarratives) combine anthropological methodology with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to form a novel approach to public health issues. This approach serves to both identify key environmental variables as well as providing context to quantitative data layers. SVGs involve video recordings of the physical environment, as well as audio, while a route is followed; this creates audio, visual, and geographic data. Previously, SVGs have been used to assess walkability, the effects of a tornado on human quality of life, and healthcare access. SVGs augment traditional interview approaches by providing context outside of the traditional, controlled interview environment, and allows for the stimulation of thoughts and memories by the sights, sounds, and smells of their surroundings. This approach incorporates the built, physical, and social environments of the participant, creating a more natural setting for the research. This is the first study to use SVGs to understand perceptions of the food environment. It will provide evidence to better inform food system interventions based on the realities of local context, promoting integration of objective and subjective measures to provide a more complete, contextually valid, and actionable understanding of the food environment. Accounting for both objective and subjective measures of spatial patterning and narratives of local food environments will reveal more precise levers to guide future interventions aimed at improving diet and reducing health inequities.

    See more details

  • PQHS Thanksgiving Potluck

    November 21, 2019 @ 12:15 pm - 2:00 pm
    Wolsten Res. Bldg. 1223

    See more details

  • Grant Submissions Link

    November 25, 2019 @ 8:00 am - 8:30 am

    Attention faculty:

    If you have any new grant submissions coming up, please fill out the form here:

    https://goo.gl/forms/yBWBqEnBRMfCpjYo1

    See more details

  • PQHS 501 Seminar

    November 25, 2019 @ 8:45 am - 9:45 am
    Wolstein Research Bldg. 4136

    PQHS 501 Seminar
    The presenter will be Scott Williams, Ph.D.

    Title: HEALTH AND EVOLUTION: THE RELEVANCE OF PQHS, AN (UN)BIASED VIEW

    See more details

  • Grant Submissions Link

    December 2, 2019 @ 8:00 am - 8:30 am

    Attention faculty:

    If you have any new grant submissions coming up, please fill out the form here:

    https://goo.gl/forms/yBWBqEnBRMfCpjYo1

    See more details

  • PQHS 501 Seminar

    December 2, 2019 @ 8:45 am - 9:45 am
    Wolstein Research Bldg. 4136

    PQHS 501 Seminar
    The presenter will be Scott Williams, Ph.D.

    Title: HEALTH AND EVOLUTION: THE RELEVANCE OF PQHS, AN (UN)BIASED VIEW

    See more details

  • PQHS Faculty Meeting

    December 5, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
    WRB-2136

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  • Grant Submissions Link

    December 9, 2019 @ 8:00 am - 8:30 am

    Attention faculty:

    If you have any new grant submissions coming up, please fill out the form here:

    https://goo.gl/forms/yBWBqEnBRMfCpjYo1

    See more details

  • PQHS 501 Seminar

    December 9, 2019 @ 8:45 am - 9:45 am
    Wolstein Research Bldg. 4136

    PQHS 501 Seminar
    The presenter will be Scott Williams, Ph.D.

    Title: HEALTH AND EVOLUTION: THE RELEVANCE OF PQHS, AN (UN)BIASED VIEW

    See more details

  • Grant Submissions Link

    December 16, 2019 @ 8:00 am - 8:30 am

    Attention faculty:

    If you have any new grant submissions coming up, please fill out the form here:

    https://goo.gl/forms/yBWBqEnBRMfCpjYo1

    See more details

  • PQHS 501 Seminar

    December 16, 2019 @ 8:45 am - 9:45 am
    Wolstein Research Bldg. 4136

    PQHS 501 Seminar
    The presenter will be Scott Williams, Ph.D.

    Title: HEALTH AND EVOLUTION: THE RELEVANCE OF PQHS, AN (UN)BIASED VIEW

    See more details